Posts Tagged ‘Relmin’

New events and projects

10 May 2011

The conference season is beginning. Those of you who are heading to the International Congress on Medieval Studies at the Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo this week will be able to meet members of the Early English Laws team at both the digital medievalist poster session on Friday 13 May and also at our session on editing (no. 385) on Saturday 14 May.

In June, my good self will be off to the conference on Law, Violence and Social Bonds at St Andrews University to talk about the Early English Laws project and also about law and rebellions in England and Denmark. The programme for the conference, which looks very exciting, has recently been published and can be found here http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims/law/programme.html. To find out more about the conference and to register, see http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/saims/law/index.html.

In addition, I have recently come across two projects that might be of interest to those following this blog. First up is the Relmin project, which has received funding for five years from the European Research Council to investigate the legal status of religious minorities in the Euro-Mediterranean world between the 5th and the 15th centuries. The principal investigator, John Tolan (professor of history at L’Université de Nantes) will be giving a paper about the project at our conference in Copenhagen in September (more details here soon). In the meantime if you want to find out more about this exciting project, see http://www.relmin.eu, particularly if you are looking for a new research opportunity, as Relmin currently has available positions for doctoral students and post-doctoral researchers.

The second project, Landscapes of Governance, is a three-year interdisciplinary venture bringing archaeology, place-names and written sources together in a national study of early medieval assembly sites. The project is based at University College, London, and headed by Professors Andrew Reynolds and Barbara Yorke. To find out more about this project, please see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/research/projects/assembly

More anon.